OWL at Purdue Logo

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/). When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice at bottom.

It's Here: A new look for the Purdue OWL!

The new version of the Purdue OWL is available at https://owl.purdue.edu/. Worry not! Our navigation menu and content will remain largely the same. In 11 days, we will be discontinuing owl.english.purdue.edu and you will be automatically redirected to the new site.

February 14, 2018

 
 

Writing Lab logo  The Weekly Writer

 
 
 

The Weekly Writer is published each Wednesday while classes are in session. As always, please share this information with anyone who might be interested.


Get the Most out of Your Session: Rhetorical Analysis

By Eliza G., Tutor

Rhetorical analyses are popular assignments in ENGL 106, Purdue's introductory writing course, because they can help you throughout your academic career and beyond to read critically in any context. They involve a selected text—a book, an essay, a poem or song, a speech, or even a visual text like an image or a film—and your interpretation of that text. A rhetorical analysis attempts to answer the questions: What is the text's overall argument, message, or theme? What is it trying to convey, and by what rhetorical devices does it do so? A good rhetorical analysis has a strong, clear thesis, a logical organization, and ample explanation of textual evidence.

If you're coming in to discuss a rhetorical analysis during your session at the Writing Lab, here's what you might expect: First, after greeting you, I would ask about your assignment. What are you analyzing? What are the instructor's expectations for the assignment—its length, citations, specific criteria it needs to meet, etc.? Bringing in an assignment sheet or rubric is extremely helpful—your tutor will almost certainly ask to see one. If you're bringing in a draft on which you already have feedback, bring that feedback along, too.

Next, I would ask what you'd like to discuss. You might be in the brainstorming stage, and want to discuss potential topics, or even texts to select, if the choice is your own. I might ask about your first impressions of the text, what you find interesting, or background information to help get you started. Or you might want help on specific parts of your essay—a certain paragraph, working on transitions, your thesis statement, etc. Discussing why you're not satisfied and what your goals are would help me articulate what to do to improve your essay. Having specific goals for the session and the essay will help you get the most out of your session.

Many of these strategies would be useful for other documents too, but every session is different and based on your needs. Remember, the Writing Lab can help with all kinds of writing, at all stages. What was mentioned above are just some of the things we can help with—we look forward to working with you in the future!

Writing Lab News & Events


Workshop: Cover Letters
Today, 1:30 - 2:30 PM
Employers are tough to impress. You know you're qualified for a job, but it can be tricky to convey your merits in a short cover letter. More Information »

Staff Spotlight


By Rachel A., Tutor

I'm coming up on my second year of tutoring at Purdue, but before that I tutored for two and a half years at my undergrad, Southern Illinois University. I majored in German and English in my undergrad, did my Master's here at Purdue in Rhetoric and Composition, and am continuing on for my PhD in Rhetoric & Composition at Purdue. Much of my research has to do with media & pop culture. One of my biggest strengths as a writer is cutting a paragraph down to a couple of sentences. My favorite thing to do in sessions is talk about ideas, but I'm happy to help with any writing task you have!

From Our Partners


English

Books and Coffee Week 3: Station Eleven
February 15, 4:00 - 5:00 PM
STEW 302/306

Patricia Boling, Professor of Political Science, College of Liberal Arts, will be speaking on Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven. More Information »


LGBTQ Lunch and Learn

Lunch and Learn Series, Part 2: Identifying Barriers to LGBTQIA+ Student Retention & Success
February 21, 12:00 - 1:00 PM
WALC B091

This lunch and learn is the second in a three part series that invites the Purdue community to engage in a campus-wide discussion about LGBTQIA+ student retention and academic success. This lunch and learn will provide attendees an opportunity to explore and understand barriers that impede LGBTQIA+ student retention and success at Purdue. You do not need to attend Part 1 of the lunch and learn series to attend this lunch and learn.

Free and open to all!
Lunch will be provided.

More information »


English

Books and Coffee Week 4: The Sixth Extinction
February 22, 4:00 - 5:00 PM
STEW 302/306

Gordon G. McNickle, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, will be speaking on Elizabeth Colbert's The Sixth Extinction. More Information »


LGBTQ Lunch and Learn

Lunch and Learn Series, Part 3: Implementing Strategies for Improving LGBTQIA+ Student Success At Purdue
March 28, 12:00 - 1:00 PM
WALC 3132

This lunch and learn is the third in a three part series that invites the Purdue community to engage in a campus-wide discussion about LGBTQIA+ student retention and academic success. This discussion-based lunch and learn will provide attendees with opportunity to learn about best practices for supporting LGBTQIA+ students and strategies to improve academic success for LGBTQIA+ Purdue students. You do not need to attend previous lunch and learns in this series to attend this lunch and learn.

Free and open to all!
Lunch will be provided.

More information »


 

Hours of Operation

Spring 2018

Jan 8 – Apr 27

Main Location

Heavilon Hall, Room 226

Mon – Thurs
9 AM – 6 PM

Fridays
9 AM – 1 PM

Evening Satellites

HSSE Library
Mondays
6 PM – 9 PM

AAARCC
Tuesdays
6 PM – 9 PM

ME Building
Wednesdays
6 PM – 9 PM

Connect With Us

Appointments

Follow us on Twitter! Twitter

Find us on Facebook!  Facebook

 

Writing Tip of the Week

"I write the bulk of my paper first, then I move to the conclusion, and I write my introduction last."

-Hadi B., Tutor

 

Book of the Week

How Fiction Works by James Wood

How Fiction Works by James Wood

Recommended by Liz W., Tutor: "This is a great resource because it dives into the mechanics of story-telling and why it is important."

You can find this book in the Writing Lab's library. Just ask the front desk.

 
 
 

As always, please share this information with anyone who might be interested.

To subscribe to this list, forward this message to our secretary, Chris Voeglein (cvoeglei@purdue.edu).

  © 2017 The Writing Lab at Purdue All Rights Reserved

 

 

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.