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Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Writing a Reference Request Letter

 

February 10, 2001

Louie Lab
1234 University St.
University City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. Lab:

You will need to write a reference request letter before you create a reference sheet to distribute to potential employers. It is meant to give the reference some warning that an employer may be contacting them. It also insures that they have the most up-to-date information about your qualifications and education. In the first paragraph, your primary goal is to reintroduce yourself to your potential reference. Simply give a quick review of the relationship and situations the two of you shared. This opening should be courteous and polite. Provide a little information about yourself. This is especially important if you have not spoken with your potential reference in some time. State your field of study, year in school, and/or career aspirations.

Next, you should formally ask to use this person as a reference. Briefly discuss the position for which you are applying and how the reference will be used. Will it be utilized as an addition to your resume or presented at the interview? This information will give your reference a better understanding of the information that would be expected from them if an employer contacted them.

Finally, close the letter with a sentence that assumes you have permission to use the reference unless you hear otherwise. You may wish to include a self-addressed stamped card so that the person may send you an answer. Also, include a copy of your resume with the letter. This will provide helpful information about your qualifications and allow the reference to speak intelligently to potential employers. Thank the reference for allowing you to use them in your job search and end with a friendly closing.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter

123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Writing a Request for Further Negotiations

 

April 25, 2001

Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

A request for further negotiations letter is much like your acceptance or rejection letter. The difference is that the request for further negotiations shows that you would accept the offer contingent on the result of negotiations. To begin the letter, thank the employer for the offer. Then state your wish to discuss things further. You can do this in two ways: a direct request for further negotiations or a conditional statement.

Next, it is important to stress the points of your contract that require further discussion. List them all, so that the company can prepare their responses once instead of in a number of letters such as this. Also, it may be helpful for you to state the reasons for the discussion of each point. This will give the employer a better understanding of your specific needs. Depending on the type and number of points you are discussing, it may be beneficial to format them in a list. This is sometimes an easier way to read and organize the information than paragraph form.

In closing, it may be helpful to suggest that the employer contact you with their initial reactions to your unresolved issues. List your contact information and when you may be reached. Restate your general appreciation for the offer and maintain a sense of goodwill.

Sincerely,


Lucy Letter
123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Writing a Reply to a Rejection

 

May 7, 2001


Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

Writing this letter is optional, but doing so is a good idea. It leaves the door open for you to apply to the firm sometime in the future when your qualifications have changed and is a way of maintaining a good relationship with the company. In the opening, thank the company for their time and consideration of your application and qualifications.

Use the body of your letter to discuss your positive impressions of the company. You might mention interviews that you had with company representatives, information you learned about the company during your application process, and any specific people who were particularly helpful or kind to you during the process.

Close the letter by mentioning the possibility of future contact with the company. Remain optimistic and thankful that the company considered your application.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter
123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Writing an Inquiry about a Cover Letter and Resume

 

March 16, 2001


Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

This document should loosely reflect your cover letter. In this opening paragraph, restate the position for which you applied, and state that you are still interested. You may also wish to include a forecasting statement. This is a brief sentence explaining why you feel qualified to fill the position at hand.

In the second paragraph, briefly restate the qualifications listed in your cover letter. Since brevity is always important in employment related letters, remember to include only your most recent and relevant qualifications. In order to avoid restating your resume, give situational examples of your qualifications. If there have been any new additions to your resume, add those as well. Here too, avoid simply restating your resume since it will be included with your letter.

Finally, in the closing paragraph, restate your contact information and when you are available. Close the letter so that the employer knows that you are still sincerely interested in the job.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter
123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

You may use these resources for working class job positions: Job Search Documents for Working Class Positions

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Rejecting a Job Offer

 

May 7, 2007


Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

The purpose of this letter is to reject a job offer presented to you by a company. It is important to be polite, while at the same time firmly rejecting the offer. In the opening paragraph, thank the employer for the offer. Convey that although you appreciated the offer, you are unable to accept the position. You may also wish to use an indirect approach, by stating the reasons for your refusal before rejecting the offer.

You should then give the employer the reasons for your refusal. The rejection of an offer is somewhat unimportant to the applicant, but it is extremely important to the employer. It allows the company to formally move on to the next applicant. More importantly, it tells the employer how to make the offer more appealing for the next applicant. After all, how can they be expected to fix a problem if they don’t know what it is? After you have stated your reasons for rejecting their offer, politely refuse the offer (if you haven’t already done so).

End your letter with a sense of goodwill. This is important because you may wish to apply for a position with the company at a later date. Also, be sure to thank them for the time they invested while working with you.

 

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter
123 Winner’s Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Acceptance Letter

 

May 10, 2001

Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345


The acceptance letter is a simple and pleasant letter to write. In the first paragraph, thank the company for the offer and directly accept the position.

Next, restate the contract provisions as you understand them. These are points that you and your contact at the company have discussed in relation to your employment. They may include salary, location, benefits, or any other items. Restate any instructions you were given in their acceptance letter to you. These might include the date that you will begin working, the salary discussed, or the hours you would be working. It is extremely important to restate these details because they provide documentation of an understanding between you and the company before an actual contract is signed.

Finally, end with a statement of your happiness at the opportunity to join the company. Be thankful and courteous, watching your tone so as not to sound too overconfident.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter
123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Writing a Reference Request Letter

 

February 10, 2001

Louie Lab
1234 University St.
University City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. Lab:

You will need to write a reference request letter before you create a reference sheet to distribute to potential employers. It is meant to give the reference some warning that an employer may be contacting them. It also insures that they have the most up-to-date information about your qualifications and education. In the first paragraph, your primary goal is to reintroduce yourself to your potential reference. Simply give a quick review of the relationship and situations the two of you shared. This opening should be courteous and polite. Provide a little information about yourself. This is especially important if you have not spoken with your potential reference in some time. State your field of study, year in school, and/or career aspirations.

Next, you should formally ask to use this person as a reference. Briefly discuss the position for which you are applying and how the reference will be used. Will it be utilized as an addition to your resume or presented at the interview? This information will give your reference a better understanding of the information that would be expected from them if an employer contacted them.

Finally, close the letter with a sentence that assumes you have permission to use the reference unless you hear otherwise. You may wish to include a self-addressed stamped card so that the person may send you an answer. Also, include a copy of your resume with the letter. This will provide helpful information about your qualifications and allow the reference to speak intelligently to potential employers. Thank the reference for allowing you to use them in your job search and end with a friendly closing.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter

123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345

Contributors:Purdue OWL.
Summary:

This handout provides several model letters for various job-search purposes including: a reference request model, a request for further negotiations model, and a reply to a rejection model.

Model for Follow-up to an Interview Letter

 

April 2, 2001

Ernie English
1234 Writing Lab Lane
Write City, IN 12345

Dear Mr. English:

The purpose of the follow-up to an interview is to convey your thankfulness at being given an interview. In the opening paragraph, thank the interviewer for their time. Thank them for allowing you to learn about the position and the company.

In the body of your letter, present a personal analysis of your interview and visit. It is important to avoid clichés and generalizations such as, "My visit to your company was very informational and interesting." Write about your impressions of the company and your review of the interview proceedings. You may also want to point out any new information that you learned about the company during your visit. If there is any new information about your education or work experience that you believe would increase your chance of getting the position, present those as well.

In your conclusion it is important to be positive and reflect goodwill. The letter's intent is to show the interviewer that you are thorough, courteous, efficient and, most importantly, that you are sincerely interested in the job. It is likely that sending this letter will set you apart from the crowd.

Sincerely,

Lucy Letter
123 Winner's Road
New Employee Town, PA 12345