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Job Applications

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
These resources will help you understand and fill out job applications. These resources will also help you start a job application information sheet you can use as reference when you fill out applications or write résumés and cover letters.

Introduction

These resources will help you fill out job applications. To use these pages, you may select links in the navigation bar on the left, you may select links from the list below, or you may advance through the pages using the links at the bottom of each page. Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

The job application pages are orgnized into the following sections:

Job Application Overview

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
This resource explains what a job application is and why you need to complete them. This resource also discusses what you should do if you have times you were not working or if you have been incarcerated. Lastly, the resource explains what information should be included in a job application.

What is a job application?

A job application is a form employers use to collection information about you to see if you are a good fit for the position. There are usually four parts of a job application:

  1. Personal information
  2. Employment information, also called work history
  3. Education and training
  4. References.


Why do I need to fill out a job application?

Many employers want workers to fill out a job application. Employers use applications to see who can do a job. Employers also use applications to read about your past jobs and training. Your application is important because it shows employers what you have done and what you can do. Your application should contain information that will encourage an employer to give you an interview.

Even if you do not need a job application for a certain job, it is good to make one of your own and keep it up to date. It is easier to fill out job applications if you have one of your own to reference. This is especially true if you are filling out online, or Internet, job applications.

What should I do if I’m a veteran entering civilian life?

It is important to fill out your application in a way that employers will understand. Applying for civilian jobs means you will have to use language people outside the military can understand. For example, in the experience section of your application you will need to do some “translating” between military terms and civilian terms:

Military terms: Received and stored bulk and package petroleum, oils, and lubricants products. Issued and dispensed bulk fuels and water from storage and distribution facilities to using units. Selected and submitted samples of petroleum, oils, and lubricants to laboratory for testing. Performed petroleum and water accounting duties (from Army Pamphlet 611-21).

Civilian terms: Coordinated and distributed petroleum products and monitored quality control systems.

What should I do if I am transitioning from the automotive industry?

It is important to fill out your application in a way that employers will understand. Applying for your new job outside the auto industry means you will have to use language people outside the industry can understand. For example, in the experience section of your application you will need to “translate” your auto industry terms:

Auto industry terms: Finished, prepared, and applied various materials, sub-finishes and final top coat paints to components, parts and complete vehicles in accordance with engineering drawings and manufacturer’s recommendations.

“Translated” terms: Worked in a team to apply paint to parts and complete vehicles following detailed engineering drawings and manufacturer’s recommendations.

If you remember specific details and achievements related to your responsibilities, you should include them:

Supervised and coordinated ten employees in automotive assembly and reviewed manufacturing processes and products for quality control. Maintained a 96% average delivery rate while focusing on lean manufacturing and continuous improvement.

What should I do about any times I was not working?

Short times in between jobs or work experience should not hurt your chances of getting an interview. But you should be prepared to talk about those breaks when you meet with the employer. If you were not working for pay but volunteered doing something in the community, talk about that experience to show you were busy doing something.

What should I do if I have been incarcerated?


If you were incarcerated, be honest with the employer and talk about what you did while you were serving your sentence that may contribute to your job skills. For example, many prison systems offer General Education Development (GED) programs so inmates can receive the equivalent of a high school diploma. Prison systems also offer vocational training in carpentry, plumbing, electronics, auto mechanics, etc. If you have received vocational training in prison, talk about this in your interview.

What will my job application look like?

There are many different kinds of job applications. Each company has their own format they use. This is also the case for online applications. But generally, job applications have words that tell you what information you need to fill in the blank spaces, on lines, or in text boxes for online applications. Below is an example of the top section of a job application:

Name  ___________________

Social Security Number  ________________

Address  ______________________________________________________________

Telephone Number  ____________________

Years at Present Address? ____________



Keep in mind that you will need to bring your Social Security Number, or equivalent such as a work or student visa, with you, along with your driver’s license, birth certificate, and current phone number and address. If you don’t have a phone number where employers can call you, make sure you ask someone to allow you to use their phone number. Write “message” on the application to tell the employer s/he should leave a message for you at that phone number.

If possible, fill out your job application when you pick it up rather than taking it home. If you don’t think you will be able to fill out the application correctly or in a professional looking way, it’s fine to take it with you to fill out later.

Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

Application Worksheet Part 1

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
This page will help you fill out the personal information section of a job application. If you have access to a printer, print out these pages and fill in the necessary information to keep with you so you can fill out applications. If you cannot print, use a separate sheet of paper and write down the information yourself.

Job Applications Worksheet

One thing that can make the job search more frustrating and last longer is trying to fill out applications when you don’t have all your information organized and in one place. Fill out the job application worksheet below and print it so you have all your important information in one place. If you do not have access to a printer, follow this form as a guide and write the information on paper. Keep track of your worksheet.

Personal Information

Last name

First name

Middle name

Street address (with apartment number)

City

State/province

ZIP code

Phone number (including area code)

Email address (use a professional address, not hotchick@gmail.com

Cell phone number (including area code)

Other ways to contact you

Years and months at present address

Previous street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

Years and months at previous address

Social Security Number (for more information: www.ssa.gov.)

US citizenship (You may be asked to provide proof you are a legal US citizen.)

Job position

Days/times available

Nights? What hours?

Weekends? What hours?

Transportation or how will you get to work

Pay or salary desired/required (also good to put “open” or “negotiable”)

Date of birth

Sex (or gender)

Height

Weight

Marital status

Dependents (children)

Have you been bonded or can you be bonded (insured)?

Have you been arrested? (Misdemeanors and minor crimes, and crimes committed under the age of 16, do not have to be mentioned. If you have been convicted of a felony (major crime) in this country, you should answer, “Yes.” It is good to then write “I will explain this in the interview.” If the job application asks for more details, write the offense, date, and sentence. But you have the option of leaving this question blank and merely write “I will explain in the interview.”

Physical or emotional limitations that might prevent you from doing the job? If so, provide details

Serious illnesses or allergies

Interests and hobbies

When can you start work?

Are you willing to get more training?

Why did you apply for this job at our company?

Do you have a valid driver’s license?

Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

Application Worksheet Part 2

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
This page is part two of the Job Application Worksheet, and it focuses on employment information and work history. If you have access to a printer, print out these pages and fill in the necessary information to keep with you so you can fill out applications. If you cannot print, use a separate sheet of paper and write down the information yourself.

Employment Information / Work History

Fill in this information to keep track of it for your job search.


Job 1 (most recent job)

Employer’s name

Employer’s street address

City

State/province
Zip code

Position/job title

Starting date

Ending date

Beginning salary

Ending salary

Responsibilities (skills, accomplishments, results, equipment used, new skills, awards, etc.)

Reason for leaving (recommended: offered a better job, company relocated, needed more hours, seasonal work, returned to school, laid off, personal reasons, will explain in interview)

Supervisor’s name

Supervisor’s phone number


Job 2 (job before your most recent job)

Employer’s name

Employer’s street address

City

State/province
Zip code

Position/job title

Starting date

Ending date

Beginning salary

Ending salary

Responsibilities (skills, accomplishments, results, equipment used, new skills, awards, etc.)

Reason for leaving (recommended: offered a better job, company relocated, needed more hours, seasonal work, returned to school, laid off, personal reasons, will explain in interview)

Supervisor’s name

Supervisor’s phone number

Repeat this information for each job you have had from more recent to least recent.

Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

Application Worksheet Part 3

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
This page is the third part of the Job Application Worksheet that focuses on education and training. If you have access to a printer, print out these pages and fill in the necessary information to keep with you so you can fill out applications. If you cannot print, use a separate sheet of paper and write down the information yourself.

Education and Training

Begin with your highest education or training experience.


College, Trade, or Technical School

Name of school

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

Last grade completed

Did you graduate?

Degree or certificate

Grade point average (GPA)

Courses

Awards or honors


High School

Name of school

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

Last grade completed

Did you graduate?

Degree or certificate

Grade point average (GPA)

Courses

Awards or honors


Vocational Training

Name of school

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

Last grade completed

Did you graduate?

Degree or certificate

Grade point average (GPA)

Courses

Awards or honors


Other Training or Education


Name of school

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

Last grade completed

Did you graduate?

Degree or certificate

Grade point average (GPA)

Courses

Awards or honors

Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

Application Worksheet Part 4

This resource was written by Allen Brizee.
Last edited by Allen Brizee on August 7, 2009 .

Summary:
This page is the fourth resource in the Job Application Worksheet, and it focuses on your personal references you should provide when you apply for a job. If you have access to a printer, print out these pages and fill in the necessary information to keep with you so you can fill out applications. If you cannot print, use a separate sheet of paper and write down the information yourself.

References

You may also include the names and contact information of people for whom you have volunteered or performed odd jobs, such as lawn care or house work. Try to list at least three people as references. You should not use relatives (mother, father, sister, brother, etc.). Also, try to find references from your most previous job, but also from other areas of your life: school, volunteerism, community or religious activities.

Reference 1

Name

Relationship to you (co-worker, boss, supervisor, clergy, etc.)

Name of organization

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

What will this person say about you? (While you don’t want to be dishonest, if your relationship with the person is not the best, you may think about using someone else as a reference. Always contact your references to get permission to use them and to let them know potential employers may be contacting them).

Reference 2

Name

Relationship to you (co-worker, boss, supervisor, clergy, etc.)

Name of organization

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

What will this person say about you? (While you don’t want to be dishonest, if your relationship with the person is not the best, you may think about using someone else as a reference. Always contact your references to get permission to use them and to let them know potential employers may be contacting them).

Reference 3

Name

Relationship to you (co-worker, boss, supervisor, clergy, etc.)

Name of organization

Street address

City

State/province

ZIP code

What will this person say about you? (While you don’t want to be dishonest, if your relationship with the person is not the best, you may think about using someone else as a reference. Always contact your references to get permission to use them and to let them know potential employers may be contacting them).

Click here to download the PDF file containing sample résumés and employment letters.

References:
Job Search Tools: Resumes, Applications, and Cover Letters by Ronald C. Mendlin and Marc Polonsky with J. Michael Farr. The Putting the Bars Behind You Series. Indianapolis: JIST, 2000.

Some of this information is also adapted from Jobbankuse.com: http://www.jobbankusa.com.